Welcome To Slaphappy Jericho!!!!

     A Lion's Tale: Around The World In Spandex - Chris Jericho 5/5
                                                           
                                                                 
      It's true I'm that I'm a huge pro-wrestling fan, but the problem is that the bio's usually suffer from WWE censorship. The best ones are those that allow the whole story to be told. Warts and all. Those are rare and only one comes to mind and that's Mick Foley's. He proved that not only is his story one that needs to be read, but one that is not only full of hilarity but the stuff that we don't see behind the curtain. Foley's book proved that you can give away all of the secrets (we all know that wrestling is fake) while still capturing the reason why anyone would want to risk their bodies doing this shit. That was the water mark, but we always get the same watered down wrestling bio. I want dirt, I want a reason to read. Gimme something that doesn't reek of bullshit.

     The fact is if you're not a fan of wrestling or a Jerichoholic there's really no reason to read this, but for those who are fans of wrestling and maybe a casual fan of Jericho's then by all means pick this one up. The book details the early years of his career and ends right before his WWF debut. You get to read about the Jericho curse and his years in Japan and other countries as well as his stint in ECW. The book though is a bit different than others because he's not a bitter guy looking to take pot shots he doesn't like. The only displeasure here is his time spent with WCW and this is where the book really gets interesting because is you've ever seen Jericho wrestle or heard any of his promos you know the guy could have been huge in WCW but he was merely an afterthought and never given an opportunity to showcase his talent.

     The book is a tale of a kid with a dream and traveled all over the world to make it. It's not a solid read despite its lack of dirt or the typical addiction that seems to flow through all of these books. Jericho's book is as honest and much like his promos, never boring. It's rare that you actually read a biography that's this good without a nice view of the gutter. Aside from Mick's bio I can't honestly tell you the last wrestling book I read straight through without sipping pages or setting it down and forgetting to finish the damn thing. As a beginning to the Jericho trilogy this is a solid intro to Jericho's career. If you ever planned to read a wrestling bio snag this one and then read Mick's
   

 

                            

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